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Science in the National Curriculum

Science is a way of thinking which leads to a way of working, helping the children to understand more about the world around them. The question “why?” must play a key role in the children’s science teaching and learning. Practical activities are normally the best medium for understanding Science. Systematic inquiry, analysis of problems, formation of ideas, their testing and modification are encouraged through whole class, group or individual investigations and project work, designed to awake the children's natural curiosity.

At St Cuthbert’s our aims in teaching science are:

  • to develop knowledge and understanding of important scientific ideas, processes and skills and relate these to everyday experiences;
  • to learn about ways of thinking; and of finding out about and communicating ideas; and
  • to explore values and attitudes through science.

Subject: Science

Spiritual

  • Science supports spiritual development by providing many opportunities for children to think and spend time reflecting on the amazing wonders which occur in our natural world.

Moral

  • Science supports moral development by showing children that different opinions need to be respected and valued. There are many moral and ethical issues that we cover in science including discussions about environmental and human issues.

 

Social

  • Science supports social development by exposing children to the power of collaborative working in the science community which has led to some amazing and life changing breakthroughs in medicine. When undertaking experiments and research children work collaboratively

 

Cultural

  • Science supports cultural development by looking at how scientists from a range of cultures have had a significant impact globally. It also helps children to understand how important science is to the economy and culture of the UK.
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